Recent News

5 Ft Long Dead Moray Eel Washes Up On Beach
Tuesday, August 20, 2013

[Updated] What appears to be a dead eel was found washed up on an east end beach this afternoon [Aug 20].


Bermuda Zoological Society's "Reef Watch"
Monday, August 19, 2013

The Bermuda Zoological Society is hosting a “Reef Watch” on Saturday, August 31, which is designed to raise funds for reef conservation. Boats will depart at 12 noon, and the field report and dinner will take place at Barr’s Park from 4pm to 7pm.


Volunteers wanted for Island's first Reef Watch
Monday, August 19, 2013

The Bermuda Zoological Society (BZS) is calling all citizen scientists to help them carry out a health check on one of Bermuda’s most valuable resources ­­— its coral reef system.


BAMZ curator hopes dolphin is outside the reefline
Friday, August 16, 2013

Authorities are still on the lookout for the lone dolphin that was feared stranded in Somerset Long Bay.


UK Zoo continues work with Bermuda skinks
Thursday, August 15, 2013

After finding themselves a new home in the Chester Zoo in the United Kingdom earlier this summer, the troubled Bermuda skink is getting a new chance at success as a species as zoo officials begin putting together a guide aimed at helping those with a hand in conservation services on the island to more easily breed and protect the highly endangered lizard.



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Latest News

All the latest updates and news from the Bermuda Aquarium, Museum, and Zoo, one of Bermuda's leading visitor attractions!

Longtail chicks might not be abandoned, but beware just in case
Royal Gazette
Friday, August 09, 2013

By Owain Johnston-Barnes
Published Aug 9, 2013 at 8:00 am

RG_130809_1a.jpeg
A bird in the hand: Principal curator for the Bermuda Aquarium, Museum and Zoo, Dr Ian Walker
examines a Longtail that was found stranded on Horseshoe Beach last week. Dr. Walker (center)
is pictured with curator of BAMZ Patrick Talbot and Kamille Minors, a summer student who has
worked with BAMZ for many years and is studying to become a veterinary technician.

The Bermuda Aquarium Museum and Zoo (BAMZ) is calling for the public to look out for stranded Longtail chicks as the birds prepare for their first flights.

A spokeswoman said that during August and September Longtail chicks are sometimes found seemingly abandoned, either on land or floating in water, but often the “abandonment” is a normal part of their development.

“Nevertheless, the BAMZ would still encourage the public to bring in a bird they believe is abandoned so that technical staff can assess the animal,” the spokeswoman added.

Over the summer months, Longtail chicks go through a eight-to-ten-week fledging process, losing their down feathers and growing flight feathers.

During this process, Longtail parents feed the chicks until they are ‘supersized’. While an adult Longtail typically weighs between 350g and 400g, the fledglings can weigh as much as 600g.

“When the chicks are ready to leave the nest they stop eating, which is a signal to the parents to stop feeding,” she said.

“Hatching and fledging in a hole in a cliff restricts the young bird’s ability to exercise its wings and take practice flights as woodland birds or those that nest in the open might do. Therefore, a Longtail chick’s first flight presents an almost ‘do or die’ scenario for the chick.

“It is at this point the public sometimes bring in chicks because they think they have been abandoned. However, the chick is actually slowly losing weight and building up courage to fly. This process can take over a week, hence the seeming abandonment.

“During the summer boating season more people get out on the water and come across Longtails they believe are in trouble. So far this year [BAMZ] have received six Longtails — three adults and three chicks.”

Anyone who finds a Longtail (adult or chick) injured or compromised in some way is asked to contact BAMZ at 293-2727.