Recent News

Baby 'pygmy' sperm whale found dead
Wednesday, July 24, 2013

What is believed to be a baby pygmy sperm whale was found washed up dead in the shallows off Nonsuch Island.


Kids on the Reef returns for a third year
Thursday, July 18, 2013

Dr Sterrer to give a lecture on Island’s biodiversity
Thursday, July 11, 2013

A local natural history expert will explore some of the miraculous ways that Bermuda’s plants and animals found their way to the Island, tomorrow evening at the Bermuda Underwater Exploration Institute (BUEI).


Kids on the Reef returns for a third year
Monday, July 08, 2013

On the way out to North Rock the young people in the boat started to wonder why they had come. Despite having lived on an Island their whole lives, most of them had never been out of sight of land. They were nervous and spent the ride worrying about currents, sharks, the weather, and the depth of the ocean.


Protecting the island's rarest species
Friday, July 05, 2013

Mark Outerbridge has been charged with no minor task. As Conservation Service’s new Wildlife Ecologist he is responsible for ensuring that Bermuda’s rarest and most endangered species are not wiped out in the sands of time.



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Latest News

All the latest updates and news from the Bermuda Aquarium, Museum, and Zoo, one of Bermuda's leading visitor attractions!

Two Dolphins Spotted Inshore Off North Shore
Bernews
Tuesday, June 25, 2013

A pair of Atlantic Bottlenose Dolphins were spotted inshore yesterday [June 24] off the North Shore, and the Department of Conservation said it is “highly unusual” for them to be close to shore and in such small numbers.

A spokesperson said, “The Bermuda Aquarium Museum and Zoo has been made aware that a pair of Atlantic Bottlenose Dolphins were spotted inshore yesterday off the North Shore. BAMZ staff are unsure of the age or sex of either animal but they both appear to be healthy.

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“It is highly unusual for this species to be close to shore and in such small numbers. There are two varieties of this species; a coastal and pelagic type. The coastal species forms pods made up of females and calves containing as 

many as 20 members. Males leave the group once they are weaned and become solitary or form pair bonds with other males. The coastal species live in small bays on the eastern seaboard of North America.

“The pelagic subspecies live in deeper, open ocean areas. Several years ago, studies conducted by the Bermuda Wild Dolphin Project confirmed that this subspecies is found in Bermuda waters with sightings often reported by fisherman. They live in groups of 50 or more animals of both males and females. They tend to be darker in color and larger in size than their coastal counterparts.

“This pair seems to be made up of 2 young animals but they don’t appear to be in distress. All marine mammals are protected locally and internationally by law and under no circumstances should members of the public approach or harass these two in any way. The Department appreciates the public’s understanding.”