Recent News

Seal Named “Northlands”, Set To Leave Island
Monday, March 20, 2023

The seal who was found on Clearwater Beach last month has officially been named Northlands — with Ruby Dill naming the seal after her granddaughter’s school — and Northlands will soon be traveling to the USA with the aim he continue his rehabilitation before being released back into the wild.


Plans Being Made To Send Seal To The USA
Saturday, March 18, 2023

The seal that was found in Bermuda last month — which is only a few weeks old — is “eating six pounds of fish a day, gaining weight, and generally doing well,” and plans are being made to send him to the Mystic Aquarium in Connecticut, with the same facility that accepted the seal that was found here in 2019, set to assist again.


BZS Trunk Island Cottage Receives Upgrade!
Friday, March 17, 2023

Thanks to the unwavering support of our donors, the Bermuda Zoological Society (BZS) has recently completed renovations to the cottage on Trunk Island – the BZS Living Classroom, the jewel in the crown of BZS education. The renovations have expanded the footprint of the current island classroom to encompass an expansion of the sheltered porches for outdoor learning while also providing storage areas for teaching tools.


Over 500 People Attend Lionfish Chowder Event
Friday, February 24, 2023

Chiko&T’s Restaurant won both the People’s Choice and Judge’s Awards at the BZS Lionfish Chowder competition, while The Cloud at the Waterfront, Wahoo’s Bistro, the Loren and the Spot Restaurant claimed second and third place honours.


HSBC Announced as Lead Sponsor of BZS Micro Forest Project
Monday, February 20, 2023

With the impacts of climate change being felt more and more each year, the need for reforestation projects has arguably never been more important and urgent. The Bermuda Zoological Society (BZS) today announced that HSBC has thrown its weight behind increasing Bermuda’s biodiversity, as Lead Sponsor of the BZS Micro Forest Project – Bermuda's Official Micro Forest Initiative.



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Latest News

All the latest updates and news from the Bermuda Aquarium, Museum, and Zoo, one of Bermuda's leading visitor attractions!

Baby 'pygmy' sperm whale found dead
Bermuda Sun
Wednesday, July 24, 2013

By Sarah Lagan - Sub-Editor/Writer
Wednesday, July 24th 9:20 a.m. 

BS_130724_1a.jpg
Washed up: The pygmy whale, or possible dwarf sperm whale, that was
spotted off
 Nonsuch Island on Sunday. *Photo supplied

What is believed to be a baby pygmy sperm whale was found washed up dead in the shallows off Nonsuch Island.

The sighting was reported to the Bermuda Museum, Aquarium and Zoo which has performed an necropsy on the four-foot mammal and has disposed of the body.

The aquarium heard about the discovery from Terrestrial Conservation Officer for the Department of Conservation Services Jeremy Madeiros who had received a call about the discovery from a member of the public on Sunday morning.

Patrick Talbot, curator for the aquarium and zoo, told the Bermuda Sun: “We responded to Jeremy’s call, went out to Nonsuch and found a male baby whale that had washed up on to one of the beaches. It had maybe been dead only a day or two. 

“We knew it was a baby by the size of it — there are no adult whales that small. We think it is a pygmy but it could also be a dwarf sperm whale which are slightly smaller. 

“Staff were mobilised and we did a necropsy at the aquarium. We have no cause of death — we believe it was a neonate which means a newborn or not long after birth which could be a few weeks. There were no major injuries just some scratches which could have happened post mortem. We don’t know how it died, the stomach was empty so it probably hadn’t been feeding for very long. It’s teeth hadn’t protruded from the jaw so it would have been still nursing. This is an animal that most likely lost its parent. We took tissue samples and they will get sent off to experts who will give us a little bit more information but that is a slow process.”

Seal sighting

Last week there had been two reports of a seal being spotted in the same area which Mr Talbot said could have been mistaken for the whale. “It is entirely possible,” he said. “But one report said the animal had whiskers — without actually seeing the reported seal it is hard to say ‘yay’ or ‘nay that’s what it was’ but it certainly makes sense that they might have spotted this baby whale.”

The pygmy sperm whale is one of the most common types of whale to become stranded on Bermuda’s shores, there are sightings every few years according to Mr Talbot.

“We had an adult wash ashore in 2007 that was alive in Ely’s Harbour but it passed away within a few days of us trying to bring it back. There was one sighted inshore in 2010. 

“As far as I know this is the first juvenile we have had here. They are pelagic — they are found in the Atlantic so they are not uncommon offshore from Bermuda especially because they feed on things like squid. We are a pinnacle in the middle of the ocean and so there is food for them to feed on.”