Recent News

Video & Photos: Turtle Successfully Rehabilitated
Thursday, February 08, 2018

A sea turtle that was accidentally caught by a young girl has been successfully rehabilitated following surgery to remove a fishing hook, with a group gathering today [Feb 8] at the Bermuda Aquarium and Zoo [BAMZ] to make the announcement, while also educating the public on how injured sea turtles should be handled.


BZS Set To Host “A Home For A Bluebird”
Sunday, February 04, 2018

The Bermuda Zoological Society [BZS] is getting set to host an event titled “A Home For A Bluebird” on Sunday, March 4, with the first presentation to take place from 10.00am to 11.30am and the second presentation to take place from 1.30pm to 3.00pm.


LOM gives away $25,000 to mark 25 years
Monday, January 29, 2018

LOM Financial gave away $25,000 to charity at an event to mark its 25th anniversary.


Flying visit for rare bird
Monday, January 22, 2018

One of the largest plunge divers in the world made a rare and spectacular appearance off the North Shore.


Island ponds given overhaul by BZS
Tuesday, January 16, 2018

Two ponds have been cleaned up courtesy of an island conservation programme.



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Latest News

All the latest updates and news from the Bermuda Aquarium, Museum, and Zoo, one of Bermuda's leading visitor attractions!

“Andy” Is Now The Longest Tracked Tiger Shark
Bernews
Friday, January 12, 2018


Andy — a tiger shark tagged in Bermuda by scientists from Nova Southeastern University’s [NSU] Guy Harvey Research Institute [GHRI] in 2014 — is now the longest tracked tiger shark on record.

“Travelling approximately 37,565 miles off the eastern coast of the United States and around Bermuda, the Bahamas and Turks and Caicos, Andy is now the longest tracked tiger shark on record and shows no sign of slowing down. He’s been going for more than 1,240 days,” GHRI said.

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“We are delighted with how long Andy has reported data, which has tremendous value for us as researchers,” said Mahmood Shivji, Ph.D., the director of NSU’s GHRI and a professor in the university’s Halmos College of Natural Sciences and Oceanography. “This amazing, nearly three and a half year track is revealing clear repeated patterns in the shark’s migrations between summer and winter.”

More than 150 sharks, including tigers, makos and oceanic whitetips, have been tagged by the GHRI in the last decade. The data collected is used to study the migration patterns of these incredible creatures. Andy and many other GHRI tagged sharks can be followed online in near real-time at www.GHRItracking.org.

“Tracking the migration patterns of sharks, like Andy, for extended periods of time allow us to better understand their behavior and habitat utilization, resulting in better knowledge on how to manage the species,” said Guy Harvey Ocean Foundation [GHOF] Chairman Guy Harvey, Ph.D.


According to a paper published in the most recent ICES Journal of Marine Science by Shivji and his colleagues, tiger shark migrations are heavily influenced by a shark’s physical characteristics [i.e. size, age] and environmental variations [i.e. water temperature, prey availability].

“This study, funded by the Guy Harvey Ocean Foundation, NSU’s GHRI, the Shark Foundation [Hai Stiftung] and the Bermuda Shark Project, reveals not only the environmental factors driving these massive migrations by tiger sharks but also highlights how the different age groups behave,” the Institute said. “This information could prompt fisheries managers to reevaluate how best to protect this near-threatened species.