Recent News

Top lionfish experts to help Bermuda
Friday, October 05, 2012

FRIDAY, OCT. 5: The Western Atlantic’s leading authorities on lionfish management are to run a two-day workshop with some of the island’s key environmental figures next week. 


Story of the cahow goes international
Friday, October 05, 2012

FRIDAY, OCT. 5: The story of how Bermuda’s cahow was brought back from the brink of extinction will hit bookstores across the world next week.


Popular Zoological Society employee dies of cancer
Friday, September 28, 2012

Friends and family yesterday paid tribute to Bermuda Zoological Society’s educational boat captain Tim Hasselbring, who has died from cancer aged 38.


Young dad's death devastates family
Friday, September 28, 2012

FRIDAY, SEPT. 28: A heartbroken wife has spoken of her family’s devastating loss after the death of her husband from cancer.


'A visionary with an infectious enthusiasm for life'
Friday, September 28, 2012

FRIDAY, SEPT. 28: Tributes from Tim Hasselbring’s close friends and colleagues have poured in from across the island in the wake of his death.



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Latest News

All the latest updates and news from the Bermuda Aquarium, Museum, and Zoo, one of Bermuda's leading visitor attractions!

Aquarium Welcomes New Tree Kangaroo
Bernews
Tuesday, July 03, 2012

The Bermuda Aquarium, Museum & Zoo [BAMZ] has welcomed a new tree kangaroo to their exhibits. Karau [pronounced KUH-row] comes to BAMZ from Lincoln Park Children’s Zoo in Chicago.

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Karau is now settled into his enclosure in the Australasia Exhibit. The tree roo which turns two in September, belongs to the Species Survival Plan [SSP], a program run by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums to protect the world’s most endangered species.

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The World Wildlife website says, “Tree-kangaroos are macropods adapted for life in trees. Unlike their close cousins, their arms and legs are approximately the same length. Tree kangaroos also have much stronger fore-limbs to help in climbing the trees they inhabit.

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“Living in the trees, the tree kangaroo eats mostly leaves and fruit, though they’ll eat out of the trees as well as collecting fruit that has fallen to the ground. The animals will also eat other items such as grains, flowers, sap, eggs, young birds, and even bark. Their teeth are adpated for eating and tearing leaves.”